Foreseen 2 Character Interview

Foreseen 2 Tall, Dark & Hateful crystal ball credit_ tina1138 https_tina1138.deviantart.comartcrystal-ball-105547570

 

Happy Monday!

Today’s interview is with the couple from Foreseen 2, “Tall, Dark and Hateful,” Lance and Bea.

Welcome you two. (deadbolts the door)

What was that?

Nothing.

Always so suspicious.

Continue reading

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Character Interview with Terrell King

Copy of Social Media – Untitled Design

Wow, there’s only sixteen days until NaNoWriMo begins. Last week, Kim did an interview on the blog. This week is Terrell’s turn!

Wah gwaan.

Hi Terrell. How you doing?

Good, good. Can’t wait for November.

Really?

Yeah. Can’t wait to wear my woman down. Continue reading

Characterization: How to Make Your Characters Come Alive

Credit image: Lidy/Somee Cards

Merriam Webster defines characterization as ‘the way a writer makes a person in a story, book, play, movie, or television show seem like a real person.’ As a writer it is not enough to describe your characters. Yes, for the reader they now know how a character looks. But they also do not know who they are. As well as you risk the danger of writing a flat and boring character.

To make your characters come alive, you have to get to know them. You need to learn their mannerisms and ticks. How they speak. And incorporate that into your story. Once you can do that, you’d have created realistic and interesting characters. Characters that readers would want to want to know more about. Here are some examples. Continue reading

Name That Character

Credit image: Writers Write Creative blog

“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet”
Romeo and Juliet
Act II, Scene II

In William Shakespeare’s tragedy Romeo and Juliet, Juliet speaks this line to portray her love for Romeo and how she didn’t care that he is a “Montague.”  His name did not matter but what is in a name? If we are to believe Juliet, then a name means nothing when compared to its nature. But as a writer naming our characters is sometimes essential to your story.

Behind the names of our characters is another story. It’s an inkling to who they are or the people they are not. It is oftentimes that the name is a special memory or link to the author. It can also clue in the character(s) role, their purpose, within the story. Continue reading