On This Day…

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February  is coming to a close and so soon too. Well, that is to be to expected as it is the shortest month of the year. It was the month of love and treating our loved ones well mostly by fattening their middles. As well as a month of remembrance about the past: our American history and Presidents. Our black history that helped shaped that history and their writings. Continue reading

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On This Day…

Credit image: Pbs.org

When I head into work in the mornings I’m sure that there’s a “Did You Know?” or “On This Day…” type of email waiting for me to open up. They contain brief information about important and or historical past events. Mostly of the organization itself and or the individuals affiliated with it. It usually goes something like ‘Did you know…so and so did this or that.’ Or ‘On this day…so and so happened.’

Sometimes I read it and sometimes I don’t. I’m sorry, but I also have a bunch of other emails to answer waiting for me as well. But it’s thanks to those emails that helped inspire today’s post. I thought and thought of what more I can contribute to Black History month. And then I thought, I wonder what happened today? Continue reading

Inspiring Authors and Poets Part II

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I had planned to postpone part two of “Inspiring Authors and Poets” until next week. That was until I read a poem by poet, writer, commentator and educator Nikki Giovanni yesterday. So here’s a continuation from Monday’s post with some more poetry. 

Now I’m not as familiar with the poetry of Nikki Giovanni but this one blew me away. It’s a poem I can relate to, as I find it similar to Mother to Son by Langston Hughes. Mother to Son addresses the relationship between parent and child. As the parent teaches the child an important life lesson to not give up easily. 

Poem for Black Boys takes a different stance. As narrator, Nikki Giovanni addresses the constant bombardment of negative notions of black society/culture. As it’s directed towards black youth as if that way of life is the norm. You can read a brief review/deconstruction of the poem here. Continue reading

INSPIRING AUTHORS AND POETS…AND BLOGGERS

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Do you know the name of the first published African-American woman?  Her name was Phillis Wheatleyand I didn’t know of her either. Not until I took the 20th Century American Poetry course taught  by my college advisor. We studied and deconstructed poems starting from colonial era poet Phillis Wheatley. To the modern 20th century poetry of Robert Frost.

I only knew of such authors and poets like Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and James Baldwin. And so my limited knowledge of other African-American writers had broadened with the course. For which I was grateful. Especially by the introduction to the life and poetry of Phillis Wheatley. A slave, who with her published works, inspired the belief in the poetic and intellectual potential of her race. Continue reading